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Why I Created FloridaGoFishing.com

Liz Lombardi, Naples, Florida

In the summer of 2010 I noticed there was no website dedicated to fishing in Naples, so I fixed that and in mid-2010 launched Go Fishing Naples. I had intentions of creating individual websites for all major cities in Florida, but after my site was reviewed by the Google team and my intentions for future sites considered, I was advised to create one big website for fishing in the state of Florida. So I change the site over to Florida Go Fishing, and here we are!

My Snook Hole

Isles of CapriI live in Southwest Florida on a wonderful bay with the channel running directly in front of my dock. In these parts it is not easy to catch the elusive snook. Locals have been known to fish for Snook most of their lives and maybe catch one or two. Well, I rented a house on an island, on a bay and found out in no time I had a snook hole in my back yard!

My dock has lots of rubble and rip rap under it and is equipped with a snook light which has been instrumental in creating a "snook hole" under my dock with an ever present community of snook. I have the snook light hooked up to a timer which brings the most amazing fish, bait, and sea creatures right to my dock as they travel the tides in and out.

Fish under snook lightFishing for snook off my dock is like fishing in a barrel, it is just amazing. I spend hours and hours out on my dock either fishing or just watching the amazing sunsets, stars, and the creatures trucking-by my dock.

I catch my own bait off my dock for the snook by catching shrimp running with the tide with a cheap butterfly net rigged on a long bamboo pole. Shrimp are drawn to the snook light and land on my pilings. I scoop shrimp with the butterfly net as they swim by or scoop them off the pilings and put them in a cheap lift-lid bait bucket until I am ready to store them in a weighted bait bucket that I drilled with holes (so it sinks) that is attached to my dock. The shrimp stay alive indefinitely as they are fed and their water is changed with the tides. Anytime I want bait, I pull up the bait bucket full of shrimp, put one on my hook and cast. My Shar Pei Dogs on my dock

Oh, did I mention the dolphins that play in my back yard. I also have a great Mako boat for fishing or just island hopping with my two Shar Pei dogs who help me fish and love boating.

My success with snook is because the shrimp I catch off my dock are the same ones they eat—snook turn their noses up to store bought live shrimp, believe me I have seen them do it. I freeline small bait hooks on loops and hook the shrimp behind their brains to keep them alive and swimming. I only let out 5 feet of 20 lb. line with 30 lb. leader line and flip the shrimp on the surface, duplicating the way shrimp jump thru the water. I sit there flipping back and forth right in front of the finicky snook. The snook attack these local shrimp with such force, every cast you make you need to hold on tight, snook grab the shrimp and bolt for a piling. Snook are famous for diving under and around piling and if you don't get your line away from the piling quick, the barnacles will slice your line, so a fast flip is necessary to keep your catch. The locals here call it "hook and flip", the second the snook grabs the shrimp you flip your pole towards land to literally flip the snook out of the water. Liz holding snook

Once I've flipped a Snook to the dock I bring it up into my yard and unhook them, then my dog Rocky will keep them corralled until I am ready to fillet. Rocky has learned Snook have razors near their gills, he just pushes them around quickly with his snout to keep them from heading towards the water.

Snook fishing off my dock is fast furious action when the Snook are feeding. Snook just love to feed at night, under the lights, during and outgoing tide. During this time the Snook hoover under the dock waiting to attack their dinner going by in the current—you literally sit there looking the Snook in the eye as you flip your bait at them.

My dock during sunsetNow you wonder, why chum when I get so much action under my dock. Well, there are nights when the tide is not moving. On these night when you are ready to fish, nobody's coming to the party. I use chum on these nights to get the fish closer to my dock and entice them to feed. If the tide isn't moving, the Snook aren't feeding. The chum works like a charm. Usually I chum with a squid and shrimp mix, or homemade chum from bait fish. I don't need to chum much, there are a lot of fish near my dock including Snapper, Grouper, Sheepshead, Amberjacks, Shark, and Ladyfish lurking just outside the Snook light.

Oh, did I mention Snook are the most excellent table fare. Snook are best eaten fresh, so only catch what you will eat. Around here we call it "fillet and release" for your dinner, that is if you have figured out how to catch Snook. Although I do not "fillet and release", I use my carcases for chum, go figure.

Update: I can not longer fish for Snook in my back yard because Hurricane Wilma decided to break up my dock and send it into my house.- I sure do miss Snook fishing in my backyard!


If you actually read this far you may have learned some things about me and Snook.Rocky and Jada on the bow of my Mako boat
I hope you have enjoyed Florida Go Fishing and learned a thing or two.

I would love to have you contribute to this website. I encourage you to can contact me if you have any questions, comments, or stories to share.

Thank you for visiting Florida Go Fishing and tell your fellow fishing friends to come by and visit the site.

 

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